Daniel Garber talks with Ema Kawawada about My Small Land

Posted in Family, High School, Japan, Kurds, Migrants, Movies, Refugees, Romance, 日本映画 by CulturalMining.com on November 5, 2022

Edited version

Long version, 日本語 付き

Hi, this is Daniel Garber at the Movies for culturalmining.com and CIUT 89.5 FM.

Sarya is a typical Japanese high school girl in her graduating year. She is studying hard to pass her university entrance exams, and hopes to become a school teacher. She likes playing badminton, and hanging with her best friends. And she’s starting to flirt with a guy, Sota, who works with her, part-time, at a convenience store. But her whole life falls apart overnight when her father is turned down for asylum, and all their ID cards are taken away.  Sarya and her family are Kurdish refugees, and have been waiting for proper visas since she was just a little girl. But suddenly she’s undocumented, can’t travel, can’t go to university, can’t take paid work or even cross the invisible border into Tokyo. What has happened to her small land?

My Small Land is a thoughtful, touching and deeply moving coming-of-age story about a girl’s life in Japan whose identity is called into question. It deals with family, culture, refugees, assimilation, and how a young woman handles a double life as a Kurd in Japan.  The film is produced by Hirokazu Kore-eda and written and directed by Ema Kawawada, her first feature. The film premiered at the Berlin Film Festival to great acclaim and opens soon in Canada.

I spoke with Ema Kawawada in Tokyo from Toronto via Zoom. 

Interpretor: Aki Takabatake

My Small Land is playing in Toronto at the TIFF Bell Lightbox on Nov 9th and 16th.

%d bloggers like this: