Is Halloween Cancelled? Films reviewed: Peninsula, Antebellum, Anything for Jackson

Posted in Action, Canada, Ghosts, Halloween, Horror, Korea, post-apocalypse, Racism, Slavery, Zombie by CulturalMining.com on October 30, 2020

Hi, this is Daniel Garber at the Movies for culturalmining.com and CIUT 89.5 FM.

Is nothing sacred? They’re cancelling Hallowe’en! No trick-or-treating, no candy, and no parties. I get it, it’s a pandemic. But it’s still Hallowe’en. So, to fight the COVID blues you might try watching scary movies at home.

This week I’m looking at three new horror movies, all violent, gory and sure to keep you up at night. There’s zombies in South Korea, a time warp in the Confederate deep south; and Satanic retirees in Southern Ontario.

Peninsula

Dir: Sang-ho Yeon

Jung Seok (Gang Dong-Won) is a former soldier living in Hong Kong. He’s a refugee, one of the last to escape the Korean peninsula before all other countries closed their gates to them. A pandemic, caused by a lethal virus created in a biotech laboratory, infected the entire population, turning them all into jerky, writhing zombies that feast on human flesh. The few, uninfected survivors – like Jung Seok and his brother in law Chul-min (Kim Do-Yoon) – are despised and feared. So when shady Hongkong gangsters offer them a deal, they take it. The job? Return to the zombie-infested peninsula to recover an armoured car full of US dollars, and drive it to the Port of Incheon to board a waiting tanker. If they survive, they keep a share of the spoils and can restart their ruined lives. Easier said than done.

Turns out, there’s not just zombies there. Chul-min is captured inside the money truck by crazed former soldiers from a rogue army base. Chul-min is forced to fight against zombies in a make-shift stadium for the soldiers’ entertainment. Jung Seok, on the ther hand, is rescued by two baby drivers, little kids who mow down zombies on the street for fun. They take him back to their family – their mom Min Jung (Jung-hyun Lee) and a deranged grandpa who thinks he’s communicating by radio with a “GI Jane” who will come to rescue them. Can Jung Seok and his newfound family rescue Chul-min, find the cash and drive it to Incheon in time?

Peninsula is a gripping, action thriller set in a dystopian futuristic Korea. It’s a sequel to Train to Busan, the hit zombie movie from a few years back.  It  incorporates themes from movies like Mad Max, Hunger Games and The Walking Dead – good people forced to live in distorted versions of their world in order to stay alive. It follows the rules of the zombie genre – Zombies are blind at night, attracted to light and loud noises, travel in packs – but there are enough new situations and human characters to keep it interesting. Peninsula is pretty good.

Antebellum

Wri/Dir: Gerard Bush, Christopher Renz

Dr Veronica Henley (Janelle Monáe) is a writer, academic and activist who is famous for her appearances on cable news panels. She specializes in the intersectionality of race, class and gender as a roadmap for revolution. She’s off to a prestigious conference where she’s giving a speech. But she is troubled by horrible recurring nightmares where she’s trapped as a slave in pre-civil war America. One day, she receives a puzzling call from an unidentified southern white woman (Jena Malone) whose voice is laden with sinister white-supremacist undertones. Veronica dismisses her as another crank.  But after a girl’s night out with her best friends (including Gabourey Sidibe), she is kidnapped and knocked out. When she awakens, she’s caught in her own terrifying dream: trapped in a southern plantation run by Confederate soldiers. She’s forced by overseers on horseback to pick cotton by day, and is sexually assaulted at night. She and the others are robbed of their freedom, identity, their bodies and even their names, and are forbidden from talking to one another on pain of death. What hell is this? Is it time travel, or just another dream? And can she ever escape? 

Antebellum is a very scary movie where the horrific world of American slavery serves as the ultimate horror setting for contemporary Black characters. It also adds subtle references to the rise of modern-day white supremacists  — Confederate soldiers march with torches just like the alt-right in Charlottesville. Janelle Monáe is great as the modern-day heroine trapped in a disgusting simulacrum of plantation slavery. But the movie suffers from editing problems – it depends on a twist ending (no spoilers) that doesn’t fit right with the supposed “magic” and time travel elements. But maybe I’m analyzing it too much. If you’re in the mood for extreme horror, violence (and some satisfying revenge  sequences) you’ll like Antebellum.

Anything for Jackson

Dir: Justin G Dyck

Wri: Keith Cooper

Audrey and Henry (Sheila McCarthy, Julian Richings) are an older, married couple in a small Canadian city. He’s a family doctor and she takes care of their home. Once a week they meet a group of unusual hobbyists at their local library. What’s unusual about their group? They are a Satanic coven. And what do they want from Satan? They want their little grandson Jackson back (he died in a car crash) and they’ll do anything to make it happen. So they kidnap a pregnant woman Shannon (Konstantina Mantelos) and lock her in a soundproof basement room. They don’t want to hurt her – Audrey keeps saying “Sorry!” and crochets little handcuff cozies so Shannon’s wrists don’t chafe – they just want Jackson’s soul to possess her foetus. Let’s not make this unpleasant, Audrey says.

And they have a thousand-year-old guidebook to tell them what to do. But their fool-proof plan starts to unravel. Rory, who shovels their snow, keeps turning up at the wrong time. A police woman drops by to investigate a missing person. And Ian (Josh Cruddas), a super-creepy ginger-bearded devil-worshipper from their coven, discovers their secret and tries to take over. Worse than all of them, supernatural demons begin to haunt their home. Will they ever see their grandson again? Or have they let loose horrible creatures from hell?

Anything for Jackson is a great horror movie about ordinary, kindly Canadians doing awful things. While it starts as a dark comedy, it soon becomes a scary horror movie powered by monsters, ghosts and demons. Sort of a supernatural Fargo, or Rosemary’s Baby but from the point of view of the Satanists. The special effects are on the cheap side, but the acting and story are quite good.

I like this movie.

Anything for Jackson is premiering at Blood in the Snow, Canada’s horror, genre and underground film festival on right now; you can watch Antebellum on disc and VOD; and Peninsula is also available to rent or to own.

This is Daniel Garber at the Movies each Friday morning on CIUT 89.5 FM and on my website culturalmining.com.

Halloween Mansions. Movies reviewed: Jem and the Holograms, Crimson Peak, The Hexecutioners

Posted in Canada, Gothic, Halloween, Horror, L.A., Movies, Music, UK, Women by CulturalMining.com on October 23, 2015

Hi, this is Daniel Garber at the Movies for culturalmining.com and CIUT 89.5 FM.

Hallowe’en is a time of ghosts, ghouls and the walking dead. But it’s also a time for costumes, wigs and other disguises. This week I’m looking at three movies. There’s a gothic-horror melodrama about a woman trapped in a haunted mansion in England; another scary pic about two women trapped in a haunted mansion in Ontario; and a kids’ movie about four sisters who form a rock band in disguise and move to a mansion in L.A.

tumblr_nr8saftnQK1tv61rvo1_1280Jem and the Holograms
Dir: John M. Chu

When Jerrica (Aubrey Peeples) was just a little girl, her dad, an inventor in Los Angeles, died. All he left her was his final invention, a mysterious, white contraption. Now she and her sister Kimber (Stephanie Scott) live in a small town with her two half-sisters, and her aunt (Molly Ringwald). This mix-and-match family gets along swimmingly — no evil step-sisters here. tumblr_nr8sg2DJX41tv61rvo1_1280They’re into fashion, music and social networking online. They make their own music, too, but Jerrica is too shy to show her talents to the world. But she records a private tape as “Jem” using a fake wig with pink stripes painted on her face. Kimber posts the tape online, and Jem is suddenly web-famous.

Who is this mysterious songster, viewers want to know? Within days top LA record exec Erika Raymond (Juliette Lewis) is knocking at her door, ready to sign her to her label. But not without the rest of my band Jem, insists. Jem packs up her father’s tumblr_nr8sfdJW7c1tv61rvo1_1280invention and the four of them relocate to an LA mansion under the care of Rio (Ryan Guzman), Erika’s son.

They perform at key locations to adoring crowds, even as they follow the clues her dad’s invention provides her. Will the band survive success? Can record exec Erika be trusted? Will Jem get a swelled head as the leader of the band? And is something tumblr_nr8scclpo41tv61rvo1_1280happening between pretty Jem and handsome Rio?

Jem and the Holograms is a movie for teen girls, based on a Saturday morning cartoon from the 1980s. On the plus side, it gives girls a chance to dream of becoming rockstars not just princesses. And the songs are catchy. But for grown-ups like me, the story is hackneyed and predictable, with not much to offer aside from a chance to see 80s and 90s stars Juliette Lewis and Molly Ringwald have it out.

cpt_photo_0Crimson Peak
Dir: Guillermo del Toro

It’s turn of the 19th Century in boomtown Buffalo, NY. Edith (Mia Wasikowska) is a free-thinker and the heiress to a fortune.  She lives with her protective father and is visited by her late mother in the form of a dark wraith warning of future perils: Beware the Crimson Peak! Lovely Edith wears angelic dresses with winglike shoulder pads, and her pale blonde hair falls in ringlets on her face. She wants to becpt_photo_12 a professional writer and hones her skills at the local press. And she is relentlessly courted by the dependable Dr. Alan McMichael (Charlie Hunnam).

But then a stranger appears in town with his sister. Lucille and Thomas Sharpe (Jessica Chastain, Tom Hiddleston) are baronets, here to raise money. Thomas has cpt_photo_2invented a steampunk contraption that mines clay for bricks, a sought-after commodity. Edith’s father turns him down, but Edith, is drawn into his air of mystery. And after a romantic waltz they fall hopelessly in love, marry, and head off to his mansion in the English moors.

But all is not well. Her father dies in mysterious circumstances. Thomascpt_photo_5 seems to spend more time with his sister than with her, and they have yet to consummate their marriage. And Edith is growing steadily weaker and more tired, her face becoming pale with dark circles under her eyes. But she can still see the ghosts haunting the cpt_photo_15strange mansion, and she is shocked to discover the secrets the haunted mansion holds.

I liked this gothic melodrama. It follows Guillermo del Toro’s usual pattern of young women discovering ghosts hiding in draughty haunted mansions. Though this one seems a bit campier than usual. The look is amazing, especially the scarlet clay that bleeds through the white snow around the mansion. It has its cheesy parts, for sure, and Jessica Chastain, as the scheming sister, isn’t as good as the other three. But a good watch if you like period gothic horror.

Liv Collins as Malison McCourt in The HexecutionersThe Hexecutioners
Dir: Jesse Thomas Cook

Malison (Liv Collins) is a prim and proper career woman who lives in a threadbare apartment with just her cat to keep her company. Her neighbour Mr Poole (Walter Borden) is her landlord, a bible thumper who curses her name. She works for a euthanasia corporation assisting voluntary suicides since they changed the laws a few years earlier. But her first assignment goes terribly wrong, so she is sent on her next job with an old pro. Olivia (Sarah Power) is a vamp in black stockings who smokes, drinks, cusses and carries a sixgun. Nudity and death don’t faze her.

They arrive at a spooky, three-storey mansion lit by candles and 24347_320_470heated by a blazing fire. It’s surrounded by a foreboding hedge maze filled with hideous statues. They have to spend three nights there, until their assignment is complete. The house has a single servant, Edgar (Wil Burd), a creepy and skinny man with a shock of long black hair. His hobby is strangling pregnant possoms. And their client is an old man with a terribly deformed face. He wants to die, but in a very specific way. Mal begins to suffer night terrors – a common symptom of this job – and has a recurrent nightmare. She keeps seeing a strange, suicidal ritual repeated by a death cult wearing hideous masks. Then she begins to see them even when she’s awake! Are these hauntings related to the house — or are the two women to blame for their appearance?

The Hexecutioners is a good example of a slow-build horror. It’s more spooky than scary for most of the film. Its not perfect: some scenes felt repetitive, and I wasn’t crazy about the music-video-style montages that pop up here and there. But the small cast is uniformly excellent,  and it’s great to see a home- grown horror movie that harkens back to early Cronenberg.

Crimson Peak is playing now, The Hexecutioners premiered at Toronto After Dark, a festival of horror, action, fantasy and sci-fi movies, that continues through tonight; and Jem and the Holograms open today. Check your local listings. Also opening is Room, a fantastic movie about a mom and her little boy who live together in a hidden room. I reviewed Room during TIFF, and it’s a must-see. Don’t miss it.

This is Daniel Garber at the Movies, each Friday morning, on CIUT 89.5 FM and on my website, culturalmining.com

October 12, 2012. Interview: Daniel Garber talks to founders Ned Loach and Robert Gontier about 360 Screenings

Posted in Acting, Canada, Cultural Mining, Halloween, Immersive Cinema, Movies, Theatre, Toronto, Uncategorized by CulturalMining.com on October 13, 2012

Hi, this is Daniel Garber at the Movies for culturalmining.com and CIUT 89.5 FM.

What would you do if you found yourself immersed in a movie — a movie you didn’t know you were going to see, surrounded by like-minded people who might be strangers, in a place you’ve never been? And what if it turns out to be not just a movie but an entirely new experience, a combination social event, live theatre, and film? And what if you’re not just a viewer, but immersed in a show and a participant in an interactive evening?

I interview the founders of 360 Screenings, Ned Loach and Robert Gontier, who tell us all about ghosts, bruises, black clothing, heritage buildings in Toronto’s downtown, interlocking stories, and their Hallowe’en screening that’s coming up later this month.

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